Pakistan: Atrocities against Hindus and Ahmadiyya community increased under the guise of blasphemy law, shocking statistics revealed Pakistan uses blasphemy laws to oppress Hindu, Ahmadiyya and Sikh minorities

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Attack on cleaning worker

Recently, on Sunday, a case was registered in a false case of blasphemy against a person from the minority Hindu community in Hyderabad, Pakistan. The man, identified as Ashok Kumar, was a cleaner living at the Rabia center in Hyderabad, Sadar, Pakistan and was attacked by a violent mob. Blasphemy is not new in Pakistan. According to the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, at least 585 people were booked for blasphemy in 2021, most of them from Punjab.

The Ahmadiyya community became a source of oppression

The Ahmadiyya community became a source of oppression

Statistics from the Ahmadiyya community show that more than 100 cases have been registered against the community in Punjab on religious grounds, including charges of impersonating Muslims, propagating their religion and blasphemy. At least three members of the Ahmadiyya community were killed in separate targeted attacks, according to the HRCP.

Muslims are also being victimized by the blasphemy law

Muslims are also being victimized by the blasphemy law

It is not that only minorities are falling victim to the blasphemy act. Muslims are also victims of this. The Christian organization National Commission for Justice and Peace has compiled statistics of cases against blasphemy in Pakistan from 1987 to 2018. According to this data, till 2018, cases have been registered under blasphemy laws against 776 Muslims, 505 Ahmadis, 229 Christians and 30 Hindus in the country. Pakistan also has a provision for death penalty under the strict blasphemy law. According to a report, blasphemy laws are abused more in Pakistan than any other country in the world.

Religious conversion patterns

Religious conversion patterns

Regarding forced conversions, Punjab, Pakistan had 13 cases in 2020 which increased to 36 in 2021. During 2021, there were reports of forced conversions from various parts of Sindh. Most of the forced converts were low caste or scheduled caste Hindus and Christians. In such cases the pattern is always the same. A girl from a Hindu family is abducted and days or weeks later, she appears in court or through a video message to tell the world that she has married a Muslim man for love and converted to Islam. . A certificate from a particular religious school or cleric is shown as proof of conversion.

Buddhists also do not believe in existence

Buddhists also do not believe in existence

Juman Bhil, a retired primary school teacher in Mehrabpur town in Sindh’s Nowshiro Feroze district, said there is a fixed quota for Hindus, Christians and other religious minorities in educational institutions and government jobs, but none for Buddhists. The Pakistani Buddhist community as a separate religious group is excluded from the national census and from educational and government job quotas.

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