Putin’s decision leaves Japan on course to break its vow to become a nuclear power again. Japan wants to restart more nuclear reactors to fight the energy crisis

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Prime Minister Fumio Kishida gave the information

According to news agency Reuters, Japanese PM Fumio Kishida has given this information. Kishida said the Russia-Ukraine war and rising energy costs have changed public opinion. Like many countries, Japan, which aims to become carbon neutral by 2050, is facing pressure on its energy supply. In such a situation, a change can be made in the policy regarding nuclear energy in the country after a decade.

Government changed decision due to Ukraine crisis

Government changed decision due to Ukraine crisis

Anti-nuclear sentiment and safety concerns have risen sharply in Japan since the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster. But the government is pushing for a return to nuclear power amid an energy crisis following Russia’s attack on Ukraine and global pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Before the Fukushima disaster, a third of Japan’s electricity generation came from nuclear sources, but by 2020 this figure has dropped to less than 5 percent.

The Prime Minister gave instructions to the officials

The Prime Minister gave instructions to the officials

PM Kishida said at an energy policy meeting that Russia’s attack on Ukraine has significantly changed the world’s energy landscape and that Japan should therefore consider possible crisis scenarios. He said that Japan should consider building next generation nuclear reactors. Kishidan has directed the officials to take concrete steps by the end of the year. Along with this, he has also emphasized on gaining public understanding on sustainable energy and nuclear energy.

7 Instructions for starting more nuclear reactors

7 Instructions for starting more nuclear reactors

Last month, the government said it hoped to restart more nuclear reactors in time to deal with winter power shortages. As of 2011, there were 33 nuclear reactors operating in Japan. There are currently 7 reactors in operation, three of which are still operational. The National Nuclear Safety Commission has given in-principle approval to restart seven more reactors. Several other operating reactors are still going through a licensing process under stricter safety standards imposed after the Fukushima disaster. Kishida also said the government would consider extending the life of existing reactors if safety was guaranteed.

Fukushima disaster in 2011

Fukushima disaster in 2011

Let us tell you that on March 11, 2011, at 2.30 in the afternoon, an earthquake of magnitude 8.9 occurred 70 km away from Oshika in the eastern peninsula of Japan. This earthquake caused a tsunami. The tsunami caused ocean waves to enter the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, melting reactors and causing them to explode when salty water entered the nuclear power plant. The plant began to leak large amounts of radioactive material and begin nuclear radiation, after which the city was evacuated. It was the world’s worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl disaster.

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