Japan’s prime minister suggests country to build new nuclear power plants

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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida suggested on Wednesday that his country was looking at building new, safer and smaller nuclear reactors to meet energy targets.

Japan is currently targeting 2050 as the deadline to become carbon-neutral, and Kishida said the country has to explore multiple sources of energy to achieve that goal, especially due to Rising energy cost.

At the “Green Transformation” conference, Kishida said, “In order to address our impending crisis of power supply shortage, we must do our best to mobilize all possible policies in the coming years and prepare for any emergency.” should.”

would be a Significant changes for Japan, As the country closed several nuclear plants following an earthquake and tsunami, which led to the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in 2011.

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FILE – Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida speaks during a news conference at the Prime Minister’s official residence in Tokyo on August 10, 2022. Kishida said on Wednesday, August 24, 2022, that he has instructed his government to consider developing safer, smaller nuclear reactors. A sign of renewed emphasis on nuclear power after many of the country’s plants closed years later. (Rodrigo Reyes Marin/Pool Photo via AP, FILE)
(The Associated Press)

Japan’s Minister of Economy and Industry, Yasutoshi Nishimura, discussed the country’s need to “secure all options for redesigning a stable energy supply for our country” and noted that “we are not interested in nuclear energy.” Will also consider all options in this regard.”

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Kishida said he has seen proposals for “new innovative reactors designed with new safety nets”.

FILE - In this January 25, 2018, file photo, installation of a dome-shaped roof cover housing key equipment nears completion at the Fukushima Dai-ich Nuclear Power Plant's Unit 3 reactor before removing fuel from its storage pool Is.  Okuma, in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan.  Japan has partially lifted evacuation orders in one of the two hometowns of the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant for the first time since the 2011 disaster.  The action taken on Wednesday, April 10, 2019, allows people to return about 40 percent of Okuma.  The other hometown, Futaba, is off limits, as are many other nearby cities.  (AP Photo/Mari Yamaguchi, FILE)

FILE – In this January 25, 2018, file photo, installation of a dome-shaped roof cover housing key equipment nears completion at the Fukushima Dai-ich Nuclear Power Plant’s Unit 3 reactor, removing fuel from its storage pool Previously in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Japan has partially lifted evacuation orders in one of the two hometowns of the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant for the first time since the 2011 disaster. The action taken on Wednesday, April 10, 2019, allows people to return about 40 percent of Okuma. The other hometown, Futaba, remains off-limits, as have many other nearby cities. (AP Photo/Mari Yamaguchi, FILE)

Toyoshi Fuketa, commissioner of Japan’s Nuclear Safety Authority, indicated that time would be needed for the country to be ready to use the new technology. He told reporters that they do not currently have safety standards in place for next-generation reactors and that it could take more than a year to establish the standards.

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Opponents of new nuclear reactors are concerned that it will be costly given the need to account for waste management and storage. They fear another accident as in 2011, as well as a possible attack in the light of Russia Targeting a Ukrainian plant.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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